Monday, July 29, 2013

House Finch sketch - Carpodacus Mexicanus























The House Finch

I have the "house finch"  all over my backyard.  They are small bodied with large beaks and long flat heads.  I see the red heads, the yellow headed ones and lots of the plain grayish-brown females.  The scientific name for them is "Carpodacus Mexicanus."

They frequent backyards and parks across the continent.  They are also all over the desert Southwest, so I have the opportunity to photograph and watch them daily.

I just returned from a trip up north where I photographed some of the largest "ravens" I have ever seen.  I plan on doing a series of sketches and paintings of those birds next.

Barbara Rudolph
email
website

Sunday, July 28, 2013

Boston & New York Museum Montage


























Museum Montage

Above are some of my favorite shots from the "Boston Museum of Fine Art" and the "Metropolitan Museum of Art" in New York.  I took all of these pictures while on vacation, with my cell phone.  I didn't bring my big camera because it was much too heavy to travel with.  I thought it made a nice little collection of images from "Michelangelo" to Botticelli" and more.  

If anyone would like a high resolution of this to use as a screen saver, just email me and I'll send you one.

Barbara Rudolph

Friday, July 19, 2013

"The Music Lesson" - International Guild of Realism show Oct 2013


"The Music Lesson"
oil on canvas
48 x 24"

"The Music Lesson" oil painting was selected to be part of the next "International Guild of Realism" exhibition.  This year the show will be held in the state of Arizona at the "Tempe Center for the Arts" in the fall.  It is a beautiful facility and is an architectural marvel.  It has a spacious museum style gallery which will host the exhibition.

The 8th Annual "International Guild of Realism" juried exhibition made the final selection, which will hang approximately 100 paintings from 93 realism artists. I am very excited to be part of this years show.
The public opening is on Saturday night, October 5th from 6-9 pm.  The exhibition will hang from October 5th - November 30th, 2013.

If you will be in the area during this time, it is a rare opportunity to see some of the most incredible realism paintings from around the globe.  Classical realism (based upon the traditional, academic-style painting techniques) to contemporary realism, Trompe L'oeil, photorealism, and surrealism are some of the genres to be included in this years show.

Barbara Rudolph
my website
email

International Guild of Realism

Tempe Center for the Arts - Gallery
The Tempe Center for the Arts is located at 700 W. Rio Salado Pkwy, Tempe, AZ

Andrew Grant Photography

Monday, July 15, 2013

Gambel's Quail oil painting


Gambel's Quail

This new oil painting of a Gambel's Quail was a commission.  Even though it has found a new home I wanted to post a photograph of it.  We have the "Gambel's Quail" all over the desert here. They are very interesting birds, not the most colorful to paint, but they are fun to watch.

Barbara Rudolph

A bird of the Desert Southwest, Gambel's Quail is common in much of the Southwest, particularly southern Arizona and New Mexico. Here they look and act very much like the more widespread California Quail, but the two species' ranges do not overlap. Look for these tubby birds running between cover in suburbs and open desert or posting a lookout on low shrubs.


Thursday, July 11, 2013


































"Sparrow"
#2 in the new triptych

This new little oil painting is painted on a 6 x 6" gallery wrapped canvas.  It is the second one in my triptych.  The "sparrows" are an ongoing series in my miniature oil paintings.  You can see the first one in the series in a previous post.

_______________________________________________________________________________
You can find House Sparrows most places where there are houses (or other buildings), and few places where there aren't  Along with two other introduced species, the European Starling and the Rock Pigeon, these are some of our most common birds. Their constant presence outside our doors makes them easy to overlook, and their tendency to displace native birds from nest boxes causes some people to resent them. But House Sparrows, with their capacity to live so intimately with us, are just beneficiaries of our own success.

http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/house_sparrow/id
_______________________________________________________________________________

Barbara Rudolph
email
website

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Hummingbird oil painting - New miniature Anna's

































Miniature oil painting"
"Anna"

Here is another little oil painting from my miniature series.  The little "hummingbird" is sitting on a branch and is bright and colorful.  They are beautiful birds.  Last week I witnessed one terrorizing another smaller sized "hummingbird" that got too close to the feeder.  I had just put fresh sugar water in the feeder and he must have been standing guard.  He actually had pinned the other "hummingbird" down in my lawn and was poking it with his long beak.  I couldn't believe my eyes.....so I banged on the window a little bit until it let the other one go and then they both flew off.  They are quite territorial.  I am not sure they were "Anna's hummingbirds" though because it happened so fast.  Sometimes with the bright glaring Arizona sun, you can't see all the beautiful colors in their feathers.  They are best photographed in the early morning hours.

Unlike most hummingbirds, the male Anna's Hummingbird sings during courtship. The song is thin and squeaky. During the breeding season, males can be observed performing a remarkable display, called a display dive, on their territories. The males also use the dive display to drive away rivals or intruders of other species. When a female flies onto a male's territory, he rises up approximately 30 metres (98 ft) before diving over the recipient. As he approaches the bottom of the dive the males reach an average speed of 27 m/s, which is 385 body lengths per second. At the bottom of the dive the male travels 23 metres per second (51 mph), and produces a loud sound described by some as an "explosive squeak" with his outer tail-feathers.

Barbara Rudolph